Coming Soon on CD from Delmark


In October...

Mississippi Heat
Cab Driving Man

Delmark DE 848

The Heat is turned up again for another chapter in the 25-year history of Pierre Lacocque's Mississippi Heat. The Living Blues review of their previous album said "Warning Shot (Delmark 839) showcases bandleader and principal songwriter Lacocque's eloquent harp playing, supported by a cast of heavy hitters that delivers the trademark big band sound...one of the hottest, tightest bands in Chicago today, and the original songs on this album are pure fun and are worthy additions to the great history of Chicago blues." Cab Driving Man features 15 new songs with Inetta Visor and Michael Dotson as lead vocalists again. The songs are a wonderful blend of Mississippi, Chicago, boogie, swing and south of the border.


The Fat Babies
Solid Gassuh

Delmark DE 257

18th & Racine (Delmark 255) was the name of the previous Fat Babies album and it's also the location of Honky Tonk BBQ where they play Sundays and recorded this new album, after-hours. The JazzTimes review of 18th said "The young, Chicago septet is steeped in the music's earliest moments, performing 1920's jazz not only faithfully but perfectly in every way. The interlocking lines, the dazzling piano runs, the cornet blasts and clarinet squiggles and lockstep banjo-it all feels so exciting, so immediate. The Fat Babies are stuck in the past, and hopefully they won't get out." Solid Gassuh features 15 songs including "Doctor Blues", "Alabamy Bound", "Delirium", "Egyptian Ella", "Pencil Papa" and "China Girl".


Shaping their musical heritage together for 15 years, saxophonist Keefe Jackson and vibist Jason Adasiewicz have been vital in defining and refining "The Chicago Sound". Their relationship with Delmark has spanned over a decade; combined they have 20 albums on the label. On Rows And Rows, six of the nine original compositions were composed specifically for the session, while the remaining three are older tunes re-imagined for duo. The atmosphere of a jazz duet can paint one of the most personal and intimate musical conversations. This one brings the listener into their world, creating a social environment that you may want to tap your foot to, or even go a little further.


In August...

 

Lurrie Bell returns with a new CD he's telling people is his best. It showcases all the passion, depth, rawness and uniqueness that keeps Lurrie at the top of many Real Deal Chicago Blues lists. His ace working band and frequent collaborator Matthew Skoller (on harp) provide the drive and the safety net while Lurrie walks the tightrope vocally and instrumentally. Motivated by his 2013 Blues Music Award for "Song Of The Year" for the title track from Blues In My Soul (Delmark 830), Lurrrie had a hand in writing five of the thirteen tracks. "Driftin'", "One Eyed Woman", "Hold Me Tight", "Sinner's Prayer", "Do You Hear", "Born With The Blues", "Hidden Charms" and more.


Recorded live at the Montreal Bistro, Toronto here's the powerful stride pianist Ralph Sutton collaborating with Jim Galloway on soprano sax and Don Vickery on drums from three nights on January 15-17, 1997. While Sutton worked with Jack Teagarden, Bob Scobey and The World's Greatest Jazz Band he was predominantly on his own throughout his long career. Originally from Scotland Galloway emigrated to Canada in the mid-60s, became a fixture on the Toronto jazz scene and appears on many Sackville albums. Ten selections include "Blue Skies", "Baby Won't You Please Come Home", "Poor Butterfly", "If Dreams Come True", "She's Funny That Way" and more.

 


Robert Nighthawk recorded for United on its first day of sessions and two of United's first five releases were by "Robert Nighthawk and his Nighthawks Band". He had a national hit in late '49 on Aristocrat and perhaps United had envisioned Nighthawk as its blues-singing slide guitar rival to Chess' Muddy Waters. Sales didn't pan out but to many he was the ultimate slide guitarist of the amplified blues era, one who influenced the likes of Muddy Waters, Elmore James and Earl Hooker. B.B. King cited Nighthawk as one of his "Ten Favorite Guitarists" in "Guitar Player" magazine. Today, more than 30 years after his death, Nighthawk is ranked among the greats in blues history.


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